Chicago crime – Baymont Champaign http://baymontchampaign.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:37:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://baymontchampaign.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Chicago crime – Baymont Champaign http://baymontchampaign.com/ 32 32 Chicago shooting leaves one injured on North Avenue Beach; 3 CPD officers injured in fight in Old Town in North, Wells shortly after https://baymontchampaign.com/chicago-shooting-leaves-one-injured-on-north-avenue-beach-3-cpd-officers-injured-in-fight-in-old-town-in-north-wells-shortly-after/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:37:30 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/chicago-shooting-leaves-one-injured-on-north-avenue-beach-3-cpd-officers-injured-in-fight-in-old-town-in-north-wells-shortly-after/ CHICAGO (WLS) — A man was shot dead on North Avenue Beach on Tuesday night, and shortly after, three Chicago police officers were injured as they broke up a fight in nearby Old Town. At a press conference on Wednesday afternoon, CPD Superintendent David Brown said groups of young people began showing up at the […]]]>
CHICAGO (WLS) — A man was shot dead on North Avenue Beach on Tuesday night, and shortly after, three Chicago police officers were injured as they broke up a fight in nearby Old Town.

At a press conference on Wednesday afternoon, CPD Superintendent David Brown said groups of young people began showing up at the beach around 4 p.m. Tuesday, responding to a “flyer” posted online, encouraging people to come to the beach.

WATCH: DPC Superintendent. Brown takes stock of North Ave. Beach and the CTA shootings

The CPD made 2 gun arrests between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m., finding firearms while checking bags, Brown said.

At 20 and 21 were arrested.

Just after 9:45 p.m., Chicago police say a 19-year-old man was outside North Avenue Beach when he was shot multiple times by another man.

The victim was taken to Masonic Medical Center in Illinois in critical condition, where he has since been stabilized.

Police said the shooter was taken into custody by officers.

He was taken to Area Three, where detectives are still investigating what exactly happened.

“I find it heartbreaking, and everyone is talking about saying something needs to be done, and nothing gets done,” said Karen Wieser Silverman, who lives nearby. “I’ve lived here in the city since 1991 and never thought of walking by the lake – now all the time.”

Police said they also recovered a weapon from the beach.

RELATED: Memorial Day 2022: Multiple arrests reported as Chicago weather draws hundreds to beaches

“We are losing tourism and innocent human lives for something they need to find the big picture to stop this,” Wieser Silverman said.

Three young women who were at the beach said a few fights broke out before the shooting. They heard someone say, “Someone has a gun, someone has a gun” before hearing at least six shots, according to the women, who asked not to be named.

“We just heard gunshots and ran away,” said one of the women.

The CPD said another suspect remains at large, but charges are pending for the one in custody.

Meanwhile, as crowds scattered the beach on Tuesday night, a fight broke out on North Avenue and Wells Street around 10:50 p.m.

Three police officers were injured there, a 16-year-old girl and two 15-year-old boys were taken into custody.

RELATED: 1 Arrested Amid Large Crowd in Old Town Chicago Gathered on North Side: CPD

One officer suffered abrasions and lacerations to his arms and was treated and released at the scene.

A second officer suffered swelling in his right eye and was also treated and released at the scene.

And a third officer, who was struck with an unidentified object in the back of the head, was taken to a local hospital, where he was also treated and released.

“I’m extremely worried. I’m worried about whether we’re supporting the police the way we should,” said Adam Hoeflich, who also lives nearby. “Something has to change, and from my perspective, that means moving more police out of office jobs and putting more civilians into those jobs, so we can focus on violent crime.”

Hoeflich urges the city to hire more police officers and offer incentives to do so.

“Right now we have an overstretched police force wasting time off and vacations and working double duty in a way that just isn’t sustainable,” he said.

Charges for the 16-year-old are now pending in this case.

Over Memorial Day weekend, police arrested several people in North Avenue Beach and also recovered 11 firearms.

Sun-Times Media contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2022 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.

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Final Count: Over 1,750 Chicago Police Officers Won’t Have to Get Vaccinated | Chicago News https://baymontchampaign.com/final-count-over-1750-chicago-police-officers-wont-have-to-get-vaccinated-chicago-news/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:27:06 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/final-count-over-1750-chicago-police-officers-wont-have-to-get-vaccinated-chicago-news/ Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s administration has exempted more than 1,750 members of the Chicago Police Department from the city’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate and has not moved to fire a single police officer for failing to comply with the city’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate. order within more than two months that have elapsed since the last deadline. , […]]]>

Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s administration has exempted more than 1,750 members of the Chicago Police Department from the city’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate and has not moved to fire a single police officer for failing to comply with the city’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate. order within more than two months that have elapsed since the last deadline. , officials told WTTW News.

That’s about 14 percent of the Chicago Police Department’s 12,537 members, twice the number of exemptions given to any other department in the city. By comparison, 6.9% of the Chicago Fire Department’s 4,801 members were granted exemptions from the vaccination mandate, according to a WTTW News analysis of data provided by the mayor’s office.

According to city data, about 5.9% of the Chicago Department of Transportation’s workforce and 5.1% of Streets and Sanitation Department employees were granted exemptions.

Of the city’s total workforce of 31,101 employees, 8.3% do not need to be vaccinated against COVID-19, with 67 exemption requests still pending, according to city data. Exemptions can only be granted for religious or medical reasons under state law.

Members of the Chicago Police Department make up about 40% of the city’s workforce, but make up more than 69% of all employees who have been exempted from the vaccine, according to city data.

Six members of the Chicago Police Department have died of COVID-19 since the pandemic began.

The debate over whether Chicago Police Department officers should be vaccinated against COVID-19 troubled Chicago politics for months, but quietly ended after the final deadline for vaccinating officers passed on April 13 and that Lightfoot and Chicago Police Supt. David Brown did nothing to discipline the hundreds of officers who refused to be vaccinated against the virus that was the leading killer of police officers across the country.

Six members of the Chicago Police Department are not being paid because they were not vaccinated or received an exemption, department spokeswoman Maggie Huynh told WTTW News. Department heads have not initiated disciplinary proceedings against any member for violating the city’s immunization mandate, Huynh said.

At the height of the fury, Lightfoot refused to overturn the warrant, even as conservative members of the Chicago City Council increased the pressure on the mayor by warning that she would have blood on her hands if the demand took cops off the streets of Chicago as homicides. and carjackings have reached record levels.

City attorneys also pushed back against a concerted legal effort led by the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 7, which represents rank-and-file officers, to overturn the warrant. All of the city’s other unions — except the Chicago Teachers Union — sued the city separately to overturn the vaccine mandate, but also lost.

Even with a decisive victory in hand, Lightfoot avoided a direct confrontation over the warrant by quietly approving hundreds of exemption requests submitted by members of the Chicago Police Department as other issues captured the attention of the police. city ​​Hall.

The last time Lightfoot faced questions from the media about the journalists’ vaccination mandate was on April 19, when she said it was “incorrect” to suggest that Chicago police officers had received disproportionate exemptions from its vaccination mandate.

Lightfoot did not directly respond to a question from WTTW News if the vaccine exemptions were granted to avoid having to fire thousands of officers as she runs for re-election and amid a crime spike. that polls have consistently shown to be the No. 1 concern of voters.

Lightfoot said all decisions on whether or not to grant an exemption from the vaccination mandate were made by the city’s human resources department.

“Our goal is to make sure we have a fully immunized workforce because that’s the best way we know, based on public health data, that we can maximize workforce protections. work,” Lightfoot said. “That’s how decisions are made. They call balls and strikes.

When Lightfoot announced the vaccine mandate in October, she said “the legitimacy of local policing” was at stake. Lightfoot campaigned for mayor in 2019 on a promise to restore public trust in the police department embattled, which has faced decades of scandal, misconduct and brutality.

The law requires the city to grant vaccine exemptions to those who are eligible, Lightfoot said, noting that the “vast majority” of Chicago police officers are vaccinated.

More than 98% of approved vaccine requests for members of the Chicago Police Department cited an “earliestly held” religious belief that prevented vaccination against COVID-19, according to city data.

Cardinal Blase Cupich has asked pastors in the Archdiocese of Chicago not to grant religious exemptions to the vaccine, saying it is not supported by Church teachings or the law.

Only 31 exemptions were granted to members of the Chicago Police Department who provided proof that a medical condition prevented them from being vaccinated safely, compared to 1,720 exemptions granted to members of the Chicago Police Department for reasons nuns, according to city data.

In order for an employee to be eligible for a medical exemption from the vaccine, they must provide documentation from an official physician showing that they may be suffering from a severe allergic reaction or other illness.

Since the April 13 deadline for vaccinating all city employees, city officials have granted exemptions to 312 additional members of the Chicago Police Department, according to a WTTW News analysis of data provided by the office of the mayor.

This would appear to leave 369 members at risk of disciplinary action or termination for failing to comply with the vaccination mandate, which represents approximately 3% of the department’s employees.

Requests submitted by 56 other members of the Chicago Police Department to be exempt from the vaccine due to medical issues are still pending, according to city data.

Contact Heather Cherone: @HeatherCherone | (773) 569-1863 | [email protected]


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Buttigieg and Lightfoot discuss proposals to make transportation fairer in Chicago – NBC Chicago https://baymontchampaign.com/buttigieg-and-lightfoot-discuss-proposals-to-make-transportation-fairer-in-chicago-nbc-chicago/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 03:56:27 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/buttigieg-and-lightfoot-discuss-proposals-to-make-transportation-fairer-in-chicago-nbc-chicago/ Dry Transport. Pete Buttigieg was in Chicago on Saturday speaking to the city’s political leaders about efforts to encourage fair and equitable transportation options for all residents. Buttigieg appeared at 56e The Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s annual international convention in Kenwood on Saturday, speaking about the critical nature of investing in communities underserved by public transit, […]]]>

Dry Transport. Pete Buttigieg was in Chicago on Saturday speaking to the city’s political leaders about efforts to encourage fair and equitable transportation options for all residents.

Buttigieg appeared at 56e The Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s annual international convention in Kenwood on Saturday, speaking about the critical nature of investing in communities underserved by public transit, and how those investments will help strengthen those communities and reduce crime in the process.

“We believe that if we invest in places that have been disinvested for years or decades, we create opportunities that lead to security,” he said.

Buttigieg spoke to congressmen on behalf of Chicago on the federal government’s $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill, $2.5 billion of which is for investments in the city’s transit system.

The main beneficiary of this investment will be the city’s plan to extend the CTA red line beyond 95e Street, according to Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

“This extension of the red line will go to the limits of our city,” she said.

Lightfoot says the funding will also go towards tackling so-called “transit deserts,” highlighting neighborhoods like Altgeld Gardens and Roseland.

“These communities desperately need the support that the red line will give them,” she said.

Lightfoot said his administration’s vision is to transform the entire city into a “15-minute city,” meaning all residents would be within 15 minutes of urban amenities.

“As we build our infrastructure, we have to do it smartly,” she said. “So that all residents can take advantage of it… (and receive) all the opportunities that come with it.

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Chicago police recover stolen Nicolo Gagliano violin made in 1758 https://baymontchampaign.com/chicago-police-recover-stolen-nicolo-gagliano-violin-made-in-1758/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 00:11:15 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/chicago-police-recover-stolen-nicolo-gagliano-violin-made-in-1758/ CHICAGO (WLS) — A violin made in 1758 has been returned after it was stolen in a burglary, Chicago police said. He’s said to be worth $400,000, according to police. CPD tweeted a photo of the Nicolo Gagliano violin they recovered. Police said it had been returned to its owner. The owner of this Nicolo […]]]>
CHICAGO (WLS) — A violin made in 1758 has been returned after it was stolen in a burglary, Chicago police said.

He’s said to be worth $400,000, according to police.

CPD tweeted a photo of the Nicolo Gagliano violin they recovered. Police said it had been returned to its owner.

It was stolen at around 3:45 a.m. on Saturday from the 1300 block of South Plymouth Court in Dearborn Park, police say.

A stranger entered the residence and allegedly took the violin before heading off in an unknown direction, police said.

No one is in custody at this time and area three detectives are investigating.

Police have not confirmed whether it is the same instrument that was stolen in the South Loop last month by a Chicago musician.

WATCH | Stolen: The unsolved theft of a $3,000,000 violin

Minghaun Xu said his violin was made in 1758 and was irreplaceable, adding that it could be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. He was taken with another violin and his son’s cello.

Copyright © 2022 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.

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Buffalo supermarket shooter charged with federal hate crimes – Chicago Tribune https://baymontchampaign.com/buffalo-supermarket-shooter-charged-with-federal-hate-crimes-chicago-tribune/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:14:00 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/buffalo-supermarket-shooter-charged-with-federal-hate-crimes-chicago-tribune/ BUFFALO, NY — The white gunman who killed 10 black people in a racist attack at a Buffalo supermarket was charged Wednesday with federal hate crimes and could face the death penalty. The criminal complaint filed Wednesday against Payton Gendron coincided with a visit to Buffalo by Attorney General Merrick Garland. The attorney general was […]]]>

BUFFALO, NY — The white gunman who killed 10 black people in a racist attack at a Buffalo supermarket was charged Wednesday with federal hate crimes and could face the death penalty.

The criminal complaint filed Wednesday against Payton Gendron coincided with a visit to Buffalo by Attorney General Merrick Garland. The attorney general was to respond to federal charges and meet with the families of those killed.

Garland placed a bouquet of white flowers tied with a yellow ribbon at a memorial to the victims outside the store, which has been closed and undergoing renovation since the attack.

Gendron already faced a mandatory life sentence without parole if convicted of state charges previously filed during the May 14 rampage.

The attack, at Tops Friendly Market, also left three survivors – one black, two white. Ballistics evidence indicated that Gendron fired about 60 shots in the attack, according to an affidavit filed with the criminal complaint.

Gendron’s radical and racist worldview and extensive preparation for the attack were exposed in documents he apparently wrote and posted online shortly before authorities said he started shooting.

FBI agents executing a search warrant at Gendron’s home the day after the shooting found a note in which he apologized to his family for the shooting and said he “had to do this attack” because he cares “about the future of the white race,” according to an affidavit filed with the criminal complaint.

Gendron signed the note and addressed it to his family, the affidavit states.

Officers at the Conklin, New York, home also found a receipt for a candy bar purchased from the supermarket on March 8, the day Gendron said in an online journal that he had gone to scout the store, along with hand drawn sketch of store layout. , says the affidavit.

The affidavit also includes detailed accounts of Gendron’s plot to attack the store, which he documented in detail in an online journal, and of the attack itself, which he broadcast live on the networks. social.

In his writings, Gendron adopted a baseless conspiracy theory about a plot to diminish the power of white Americans and “replace” them with people of color, through immigration and other means.

The messages detail months of reconnaissance, demographic research and gunnery training for a bloodbath aimed at scaring everyone who is not white and Christian out of the country.

Gendron traveled more than 200 miles (320 kilometers) from his home in an almost all-white town near the New York-Pennsylvania border to a predominantly black part of Buffalo. There, authorities say, he mowed down shoppers and workers using an AR-15-style rifle, wearing body armor for protection and live-streaming the carnage from a mounted camera on a helmet.

Gendron’s rifle bore writing, including the names of others who committed mass shootings, racial slurs and statements such as “Here are your repairs!”, and a reference to the replacement theory, according to the affidavit.

The 18-year-old surrendered to police as he left the supermarket.

He pleaded not guilty to a charge of domestic terrorism, including hate-motivated domestic terrorism and murder.

According to online documents attributed to Gendron, he had scouted the supermarket in March, drawing maps and even counting the number of black people he saw there.

Federal authorities had said they were considering hate crime charges in the killings, adding to the ongoing toll of gun violence in the United States.

Ten days after the Buffalo attack, another 18-year-old armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire on an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, killing 19 children and two teachers.

Soon after, New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed 10 public safety-related bills into law, including one banning New Yorkers under 21 from buying semi-automatic rifles and another that Revised the state’s “Red Flag” law, which allows courts to temporarily remove firearms from people who may pose a threat to themselves or others.

The U.S. Senate followed on June 12 with a bipartisan agreement on more modest federal gun restrictions and increased efforts to improve school safety and mental health programs.

The case is likely to present a dilemma for Garland, who has vowed to aggressively prioritize the prosecution of civil rights cases but also instituted a moratorium on federal executions last year after an unprecedented string of capital punishments. at the end of the Trump administration.

The moratorium put in place in July 2021 prevents the Bureau of Prisons from carrying out any executions. But the memo does not bar federal prosecutors from seeking the death penalty, a decision that will ultimately be up to Garland. The Biden administration previously asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate the Boston Marathon suicide bomber’s original death sentence.

The executions have been halted as the Justice Department conducts a review of its capital punishment policies and procedures. The review, which is ongoing, comes after 13 people were executed at the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Indiana, between July 2020 and January 2021.

President Joe Biden has said he opposes the death penalty and his team has vowed he will take action to stop its use while in office.

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Jim Ryan, two-term Illinois attorney general, dies at 76 – NBC Chicago https://baymontchampaign.com/jim-ryan-two-term-illinois-attorney-general-dies-at-76-nbc-chicago/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 23:10:26 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/jim-ryan-two-term-illinois-attorney-general-dies-at-76-nbc-chicago/ Jim Ryan, who served two terms as Illinois attorney general and unsuccessfully ran for governor, has died. He was 76 years old. A reluctant politician and no-nonsense prosecutor whose career success was tempered by personal tragedy, Ryan died Sunday at his DuPage County home after “several long illnesses,” family spokesman Dan Curry said. Stoic and […]]]>

Jim Ryan, who served two terms as Illinois attorney general and unsuccessfully ran for governor, has died. He was 76 years old.

A reluctant politician and no-nonsense prosecutor whose career success was tempered by personal tragedy, Ryan died Sunday at his DuPage County home after “several long illnesses,” family spokesman Dan Curry said.

Stoic and soft-spoken, Ryan, a Republican, was widely regarded as an administrator dedicated to integrity and efficiency. He didn’t like the mandatory retail policy of handshakes and pats on the back.

“Although it was his life’s work, Jim never really felt comfortable in the realm of politics…” said Stephen Culliton, former DuPage County Chief Justice and friend of Ryan’s longtime. “When the inevitable conflicts arose between the politically beneficial thing and the ‘right’ thing, he always did the right thing.”

After three terms as DuPage County state’s attorney, Ryan, a former teenage middleweight champion in the Chicago Golden Gloves novice division, became attorney general in 1995 and was easily re-elected in 1998. .

His 2002 gubernatorial aspirations were complicated by trying to succeed Republican Gov. George Ryan – no relation – who had been embroiled in a bribery scheme and would later serve five years in prison. Jim Ryan lost to Democrat Rod Blagojevich, who would ultimately be convicted in another corruption scandal and spend years in prison.

Jim Ryan also unsuccessfully sought the 2010 Republican primary for governor in a bid for a comeback.

“From the time I met him until his death, Jimmy always strived to do the right thing and help people,” said Marie, Ryan’s wife of 54 years. “That was who he was and he did very well.”

Ryan and his family suffered repeated seizures. In 1996, he was diagnosed with large cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which he battled and two subsequent cancer attacks. Her youngest child, 12-year-old Annie, collapsed in January 1997 and died of an undetected brain tumour. Ten months later, Marie Ryan nearly died of a serious heart condition. And in 2007, her 24-year-old son Patrick died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

After leaving office, Ryan founded the Center for Civic Leadership at the Benedictine University of Lisle to strengthen student participation in civic life and civil politics. The annual Annie Ryan Run, which he and Marie sponsor, has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for brain tumor research. For several years, they hosted the Patrick Ryan Main Event featuring amateur boxing which raised money for families struggling with suicide.

“He never stopped trying to help people – women, children, victims of crime,” said former aide John Pearman. “He was tireless and incorruptible.”

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Chicago shooting: 15 shots, 3 fatally, in weekend violence across city, CPD says https://baymontchampaign.com/chicago-shooting-15-shots-3-fatally-in-weekend-violence-across-city-cpd-says/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/chicago-shooting-15-shots-3-fatally-in-weekend-violence-across-city-cpd-says/ CHICAGO — The weekend shootings in Chicago left at least 15 people injured, three of them fatally, police said. Five people were injured Saturday in a drive-by shooting in the city’s South End, according to Chicago police. The victims were standing in an alley on the 8600 block of S. Damen Avenue in the Gresham […]]]>
CHICAGO — The weekend shootings in Chicago left at least 15 people injured, three of them fatally, police said.

Five people were injured Saturday in a drive-by shooting in the city’s South End, according to Chicago police. The victims were standing in an alley on the 8600 block of S. Damen Avenue in the Gresham neighborhood at around 3.20pm when an unknown vehicle drove by and someone inside began shooting at the group. A 39-year-old man was shot in the left leg, a 24-year-old man was also shot in the left leg and foot, and a 42-year-old man and a fourth man of unknown age suffered multiple gunshot wounds. to the body. All four were taken to Christ Hospital in varying conditions, police said. A fifth person was taken to Little Company of Mary Hospital, the CPD said. Area 2 detectives are investigating.

A man was found shot dead inside a car early Saturday in South Commons on the South Side. The man, 34, was found on the driver’s side of a car in the 2800 block of South Indiana Avenue around 2:30 a.m. with gunshot wounds to his chest, Chicago police said. He was initially taken to Stroger Hospital in critical condition, but later died of his injuries, police said. No one was in custody. The man is the fifth person killed this year in the Douglas Community Area, which covers South Commons, according to Chicago Sun-Times data. Last year, the community recorded six murders during the same period.

A woman was shot and killed while inside a car early Saturday in East Garfield Park on the West Side. The woman, 37, was a passenger in a car on the first block of South Albany Avenue around 12:20 p.m. when someone outside fired into the car, hitting her in the head and body, Chicago police said. She was initially taken to Stroger Hospital in critical condition, but died of her injuries, police said. No one was in custody. The woman is the fifth person murdered in East Garfield Park so far this year – a third of the murders recorded in the area last year during the same period, according to Sun-Times data.

More than an hour earlier, another passenger inside a car was shot and killed in East Pilsen on the Lower West Side. The 26-year-old man was a passenger in a car driving down the 400 block of West 18th Street around 11:05 p.m. Friday when a black sedan pulled up next to them and someone inside interior opened fire, Chicago police said. He was taken to Stroger Hospital and died of his injuries, police said. No one was in custody. The man is the second person killed on the Lower West Side, which covers East Pilsen, this year, according to data from the Chicago Sun-Times. Last year, the region recorded no murders during the same period.

In non-fatal shootings, three people were shot while walking along the lake early Saturday near the museum campus on the near south side. The injured were walking along the lake in the 1200 block of South Jean-Baptiste Pointe DuSable Lake Shore Drive around 1:30 a.m. when they were hit by gunfire, Chicago police said. A 19-year-old man was shot in the face and taken to Stroger Hospital in critical condition, police said. Another man, 20, was taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital with a gunshot wound to the chest, police said. His condition has stabilized. A third man, 18, was shot in the leg and taken to Stroger undamaged, officials said. No one was in custody.

There were 28 bullets, including four fatalities, in Chicago last weekend.

ABC7 Chicago contributed to this report.

(Source: Sun-Times Media Wire – Copyright Chicago Sun-Times 2022.)

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City council urged to act on reparations through guaranteed income scheme for black men https://baymontchampaign.com/city-council-urged-to-act-on-reparations-through-guaranteed-income-scheme-for-black-men/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 22:44:00 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/city-council-urged-to-act-on-reparations-through-guaranteed-income-scheme-for-black-men/ Chicago was again urged on Thursday to move toward providing some form of reparations to descendants of African-American slaves, perhaps starting with guaranteed minimum income checks, focused on unemployed black men. prone to violence. In early 2021, Kamm Howard, co-chair of the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America, testified virtually at the city […]]]>

Chicago was again urged on Thursday to move toward providing some form of reparations to descendants of African-American slaves, perhaps starting with guaranteed minimum income checks, focused on unemployed black men. prone to violence.

In early 2021, Kamm Howard, co-chair of the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America, testified virtually at the city council’s first subcommittee meeting on reparations.

He then urged Chicago aldermen to use the reparations paid to victims of Jon Burge’s era of torture as a model for reparations.

On Thursday, Howard delivered a similar but more pointed message at the subcommittee’s second meeting, perhaps because those two meetings were separated by 15 months of inaction.

His PowerPoint presentation focused on Columbia University studies of two crime-ridden Chicago communities, Englewood and West Garfield Park, and the overwhelming number of households in these neighborhoods with no fathers present.

A slide in the presentation listed grim statistics on “black male labor force participation” in America’s largest cities: 12% for men ages 16-20 and 28% for men ages 16-24 year. It rises to 50% for the 16-60 age group.

No wonder so many men find themselves in “survival mode,” as Howard put it, working in an “informal economy” that relies on acts of violence.

This is followed by a slide entitled: “Reparations as public safety”.

It recommended a Guaranteed Basic Income program that “takes” black men off the streets and “significantly reduces their reliance on the violence-ridden illegal economy.”

He noted that the average income for these men is $700 to $900 a month, so a basic income of $600 to $800 would replace most of that. Income would be provided for up to two years, and only if men remain in remedial care, with the aim of eventually entering the workforce and supporting their children.

Mayoral challenger Roderick Sawyer (6th), who chairs the health and human services committee that created the reparations subcommittee, criticized Mayor Lori Lightfoot for using $31 million in federal stimulus funds to distribute $500 a month to 500 needy Chicagoans for one year.

Sawyer was more receptive to the two-year income program, but only if conditions are attached.

“There should be some responsibility with that. They should do something in exchange for that. Maybe an assessment. Perhaps, if necessary, behavioral assistance. Attend meetings or speak with professionals. And also maybe some work, if you will. Not something major. But something to engage in the community while you get that stipend,” Sawyer said.

Sawyer was asked why so little progress had been made on reparations in Chicago when the subcommittee was created two years ago.

“The mayor is not as supportive as I would have hoped. … Many of us want to go further. But there’s been some pushback from an administration that doesn’t think that’s the way to go,” Sawyer said.

“I keep pushing. I insisted on this for years. I will continue to make it a problem. If we do it right, we’ll see a corresponding drop in criminal activity as well as health outcomes and other things that we know of in the black community.

Aldus. Stephanie Coleman (16), co-chair of the reparations subcommittee, said a Guaranteed Basic Income program for African-American men “would give some young people the opportunity to be stewards of their communities and be agents of change.

“If we can find $12 million for gas cards, we can definitely find resources to really respond to one of our city’s most vulnerable populations,” Coleman said.

“It can really help make our city a better and safer city.”

Coleman didn’t hesitate when asked why repairs in Chicago were moving at such a snail’s pace.

“It is the only committee that is not supported. There are no resources or politics. We have nothing,” she said, especially against an already approved repair program in Evanston.

“I hope our budget department sees that the need is there. … I admire and am a bit jealous of Evanston because they laid the groundwork. In Chicago, we should be setting the trend instead of following. »

In November 2019, Evanston made history by establishing a $10 million reparations fund to repair the black population of this northern suburb for historic wrongs related to racial inequality. The money will come from a tax on cannabis sales.

The old Evanston Ald was a major driving force behind this pioneering effort. Robin Rue Simmons, who spoke at Thursday’s hearing, just as she did at the first hearing.

She noted that “more than 100 municipalities” have advanced local repair orders.

“What city more than Chicago should advance reparations for its crimes and harms against its black community?” asked Simon.

“When I conducted this work in Evanston, I did so looking at a $46,000 household income gap between blacks and whites in Evanston. I imagine that’s more the case in Chicago. In Evanston, we had a difference in life expectancy of 13 years. This data was enough for us to move the repairs forward. In Chicago, it’s 30 years.

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Lightfoot splashes the crowded Chicago mayoral field with re-election launch https://baymontchampaign.com/lightfoot-splashes-the-crowded-chicago-mayoral-field-with-re-election-launch/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:59:53 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/lightfoot-splashes-the-crowded-chicago-mayoral-field-with-re-election-launch/ Lightfoot’s biggest recent victory is one that eluded his predecessors: a deal to build a casino in Chicago, where a portion of the proceeds will go to pay the pensions of police and firefighters who upset former executives. It’s a move that will reduce the chances that she will need to enact deeply unpopular property […]]]>

Lightfoot’s biggest recent victory is one that eluded his predecessors: a deal to build a casino in Chicago, where a portion of the proceeds will go to pay the pensions of police and firefighters who upset former executives. It’s a move that will reduce the chances that she will need to enact deeply unpopular property tax hikes ahead of the 2023 municipal elections.

But after winning a runoff election in 2019 where she swept all 50 Chicago wards as a political underdog and reform candidate, Lightfoot has a real fight on her hands. A city once ruled for decades by Mayor Richard M. Daley is feeling the mayor’s turnover. And despite his accomplishments and aggressive fundraising operation, Lightfoot has plenty of critics across the political spectrum – attracting at least six crime-focused challengers.

“So many people in the city are concerned about safety, and until they feel safe and secure, Mayor Lightfoot’s campaign is on the line,” said former Democratic Senator Susan Garrett. state and now president of the nonprofit Center for Illinois Politics. “Her heart is in the right place and I think she’s working hard. That’s a challenge for any Chicago mayor, but that’s what she should be focusing on.

Lightfoot remains the frontrunner in the race given that his competitors are less funded and, for the most part, lesser known: State Rep. Kam Buckner, Ald. Raymond Lopez, Ald. Roderick Sawyer, businessman Willie Wilson, former Chicago Public Schools leader Paul Vallas, and LGBTQ media consultant DJ Doran.

Although Chicago police say violence is on the decline, residents still see it as the No. 1 problem, according to a poll by other campaigns. Over the Memorial Day weekend alone, more than 50 people were shot, nine of them fatally. A deadly shooting in the middle of Millennium Park, a popular tourist district, shook the city. And a third Chicago police officer was shot last weekend.

Many of Lightfoot’s opponents launched their campaigns in part by attacking the mayor’s handling of violence. And to his critics more broadly, Lightfoot is a mayor without a plan.

She hired a police chief who struggled to gain support from her ranks. And after years of attracting the attention of his predecessor, Rahm Emanuel, Chicago’s downtown business district felt ignored – a feeling that boiled over when violence erupted along the Magnificent Mile after the murder of George Floyd in 2020.

Lightfoot stepped up his criticism of the criminal justice system for releasing too many alleged offenders before trial, urging criminal court judges to exercise more discretion. “We don’t want to turn Cook County Jail into a debtors’ jail,” she told reporters this week. “But residents of our community also have the right to be safe from dangerous people.”

A common thread for Lightfoot is his emphasis on stronger ethics rules across city government, including local lawmakers.

She was elected as a reformer after speaking out against the hypocrisy of leaving Democrat Ald. Edward Burke remains a fixture in city government as he faces a federal investigation for using his office for personal gain. As mayor, Lightfoot introduced ethics measures that strengthen the inspector general’s office and tighten rules for disclosure of lobbying activities within city council. It also introduced heavier fines for ethics violations.

“She’s made more progress on ethics and good governance than anyone since Harold Washington,” former city councilman and political consultant Dick Simpson said in an interview, comparing Lightfoot to Chicago’s first black mayor. Simpson was part of Lightfoot’s inner circle when she first ran for office and he also supports her 2023 run.

But others say Lightfoot’s record on transparency has failed to live up to his campaign promises, pointing to a botched police raid on the home of Anjanette Young, a black social worker who was forced to stand naked and handcuffed. Although the incident took place before Lightfoot was mayor, his administration was not immediately made aware of it when the details were made public last year.

Another key campaign promise was to bring transparency to city government by loosening the near-one-sided grip city council members have on matters within their wards — everything from controlling who gets a business license and the types of panels they can display. Although she has made some progress in ending the cultivation, the practice still persists.

“Many had hoped that she would really make this type of reform a priority. And I don’t know if we’ve seen that,” said Alisa Kaplan, executive director of nonpartisan reform for Illinois. “I think that’s partly because things look different between a candidate’s position and an office holder’s position.”

What really bothers Lightfoot’s critics is the mayor’s snappy behavior – something they say hampers city management – and his critics are likely to focus on his temper throughout the campaign at the town hall.

In a dispute with lawyers for the Joint Civic Committee of Italian Americans involving a statue of Christopher Columbus, Lightfoot is accused of saying, “My dick is bigger than yours and Italians, I have the biggest dick in Chicago.”

Lightfoot denies making the comment, but that didn’t stop the headlines in part because it didn’t seem out of place to the mayor, which made the statement hard to shake. Supporters call it a double standard, noting that Lightfoot’s male predecessors — particularly Emanuel, whose penchant for profanity is well known in Washington — were known to have similar choice words in hot moments.

“Lightfoot is vulnerable due to self-inflicted injuries. She wants to rule like Daley and Emanuel, but she was elected on the promise of something different,” said Delmarie Cobb, a longtime Chicago-based political consultant who has worked on multiple Democratic campaigns. “What is most surprising are the incidents that show a lack of finesse and polish.”

But Lightfoot embraces his candor.

“When we fight for change, confront a global pandemic, work to keep kids in school, confront guns and gangs, systemic inequality and political corruption only for powerful forces to try to stop the progress of Chicago — of course, I take it personally, for our city,” she said in her campaign launch video on Tuesday.

Lightfoot allies point out personality traits they like.

“She has determination. She doesn’t want to go back to the old way of doing business in this town,” Ald said. Scott Waguespack, whom Lightfoot appointed to the city council’s finance committee. “She pushed us all to invest in areas of the city that had been neglected for decades. Finances are improving, and minority participation in city finances has increased significantly for the first time.

Chicago is used to having abrasive and aggressive mayors, said Democratic state Rep. Kelly Cassidy, an ally who has known Lightfoot for 30 years.

“Then comes a black lesbian and suddenly people are clenching their beads,” she said. “I want my mayor to throw for my city.”

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Here’s Who’s Running in Illinois’ 5th Congressional District – NBC Chicago https://baymontchampaign.com/heres-whos-running-in-illinois-5th-congressional-district-nbc-chicago/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 22:53:57 +0000 https://baymontchampaign.com/heres-whos-running-in-illinois-5th-congressional-district-nbc-chicago/ Illinois’ 5e The congressional district, which covers parts of Cook and DuPage counties, has been represented by Congressman Mike Quigley since 2009, and he is running for another term this year. Quigley, who won a special election to replace former Rep. Rahm Emanuel in the 5e District, has been re-elected six times, and his opponent […]]]>

Illinois’ 5e The congressional district, which covers parts of Cook and DuPage counties, has been represented by Congressman Mike Quigley since 2009, and he is running for another term this year.

Quigley, who won a special election to replace former Rep. Rahm Emanuel in the 5e District, has been re-elected six times, and his opponent in the last election will try to overthrow him again in November.

Here are the candidates of the 5e District:

Democrats:

Representative Mike Quigley

Quigley has served in Congress since being elected in a special vote in April 2009. His platform emphasizes LGBTQ+ rights, a diplomatic-focused foreign policy, and a strong push for funding for business creation programs. jobs and immigration reforms, among other policies. .

Republicans:

Tom Hanson

Hanson, who lost to Quigley in the 2020 election, is targeting another attempt to unseat the incumbent congressman. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, Hanson is a commercial real estate broker who wants to focus on eliminating corruption in government, as well as providing vouchers for parents to send students to private schools.

Malgorzata McGonigal

McGonigal, who has a background in the finance and auto industries, has pledged to focus his campaign on crime reduction, education reform, implementing a tax lump sum in the United States and a return to “traditional family values,” according to its website.

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